Why Florida keeps rebuilding after storms

Climate Change Hurricane Ian Rebuilding

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What will it take for most Americans to realize the risks of a changing climate? As global leaders meet in Egypt for #COP27 and as the United States takes stock the day after the mid-term elections, Florida residents are grappling with whether to shelter in place following the destructive path of #HurricaneIan, or to build back better from a climate resilience standpoint.

Evidence suggests they will quickly forget the catastrophic damages of Ian in favor of focusing on the costs imposed by stronger building codes.

The Miami Herald’s Alex Morris captures this dilemma by exploring the aftermath of 2018’s #HurricaneMichael, which destroyed 93% of Mexico Beach, Florida. 

“Watching a community that learned the hard way and made the right decisions, and then watching them backpedal because their memory became so short, it was just really hard to watch,” floodplain management consultant Del Schwalls told Morris.

“There’s a lot of decisions we made 20 years ago, on Fort Myers Beach that resulted in somebody dying in Ian, that resulted in somebody losing everything in Ian,” he added. “What are the decisions we make today that will save someone’s life 20 years from now?”

At Climate Alpha, our goal is to provide our customers — whether public- or private sector — with the tools necessary to make those life-or-death decisions.

By combining our Resilience Index™ scores for every county in American with our patent-pending scenario forecaster, clients are empowered to explore how and where to best spend their adaptation resources. 

As COP 27 and the elections remind us, the choices we make today will shape the world for decades. Visit www.climatealpha.ai to learn more about how we can help.

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