Why Ian May Push Florida Real Estate Out of Reach for All but the Super Rich

Hurrican Ian Climate Adaptation Real Estate Flooding

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The next victim of climate change is the American Dream. As the scale of #HurricaneIan’s losses mount — $67 billion in privately insured losses and counting

The New York Times discusses how Hurricane Ian’s record breaking cost will make it even harder for many to get insurance — Florida’s insurance market faces collapse as FEMA and reinsurers alike reprice the risks and race premiums accordingly. The result might be a housing market in which homeownership is the sole preserve of those with deep enough pockets to buy a house in cash and pay to rebuild at any price.

“Ian’s aftermath shows how climate change is increasingly eroding the financial underpinnings of modern American life,” writes The New York Times‘ Christopher Flavelle. “Without insurance, banks won’t issue a mortgage; without a mortgage, most prospective homeowners can’t buy a home. With fewer buyers, home prices fall, and new development can slow or even come to a stop.”

While Florida has held out against this vicious circle for decades, past results do not guarantee future performance. At Climate Alpha, our suite of tools help homebuilders, developments, asset managers, and reinsurers — not to mention homeowners themselves — understand these risks and steer them to neighboring opportunities. Visit Climate Alpha’s Product Page to learn more about how we can help you understand when — and where — the American Dream is at risk… and where it’s thriving.

#realestate #flooding #climateadaptation #climaterisks#creditrisk #sustainablefinance

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